Dec 11, 2014

Ouija boards are the must-have gift this Christmas, fuelled by a schlock horror film

The saddest post of the day.  I know from first-hand testimony that Ouija boards work...that is they are successful in connecting ignorant folks with demons.  And the results are never good.  If you have a Ouija board, throw it out, or better yet, burn it.  Why would someone buy a tool to contact demons rather than humbling themselves to contact their Creator?  Madness...the madness of the last days...

What better time to talk to dead people for fun than the festival to celebrate the birth of Jesus? Ouija boards are flying themselves off shelves and under trees this Christmas, according to trends data released by Google. The company has recorded a 300 per cent increase in searches for the spirit-bothering devices, fuelled by a terrible movie that was effectively a feature-length ad for a board game, an appearance on The Archers, and the Victorian belief that if the dead could speak, they would use a plank of a wood and the alphabet.

Ouija, released in October in time for Halloween, was, by all accounts, a cliché-ridden turkey about a group of teenage girls who experiment with a board and get scared. It has a disastrous 7 per cent rating on Rotten Tomatoes, the review aggregating site, but became an occult hit, to the delight of its backers. Hasbro, the toy company behind Monopoly, pushed for the revival of the film, which had stalled in development, and partnered with Universal to make it happen. Its Ouija Game, including a glow-in-the-dark version, is Рsure enough Рthe biggest seller online.

All of which is appropriate, because the Ouija-board trend, circa 1890, was always about selling games. Spirit writing dates back much further. In 12th-century China, it was believed that spirits had the power to guide a "planchette" to write Chinese characters. In the late 19th century, when doubts about God inspired by Darwin's little birds led to a boom in spiritualism, planchettes became a novelty hit in the west. Elijah Bond, an American lawyer and inventor from Baltimore, devised and patented in 1891 "a toy or game by which two or more persons can amuse themselves by asking questions of any kind and having them answered by the device used and operated by the touch of the hand, so that the answers are designated by letters on a board".

Read the rest of this article at - http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/christmas/gifts/ouija-boards-are-the-musthave-gift-this-christmas-fuelled-by-a-schlock-horror-film-9885749.html